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DID YOU KNOW

  • One out of three children born in the United States in the year 2000 will develop diabetes.
  • One third of children and adolescents in the U.S. are overweight or obese.
  • The National School Lunch Program serves approximately 30.5 million lunches per day at a cost of $8.7 billion a year.
  • Most of our food travels 1,500 miles before we eat it.

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SCHOOL FOOD GUIDES

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DATES TO ORGANIZE AROUND

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ORGANIZATIONS

BALTIMORE GROUPS
 

SCHOOL FOOD GROUPS
 

SCHOOL GARDENS
 

HEALTHY KIDS/CHILDHOOD OBESITY

FOOD POLICY

  • Animal Welfare Approved
  • Center for Informed Food Choices
  • Center for Science in the Public Interest
  • Food Democracy Now
  • Food Studies Institute
  • Growing Power
  • Johns Hopkins University Center for a Livable Future
  • Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine
  • Slow Food USA

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    BOOKS

  • Lunch Lessons: Changing the Way We Feed Our Children
    by Ann Cooper & Lisa M. Holmes (Harper Collins © 2006)
    Shows parents and school employees how they can help instill healthy eating habits in children, including tips on the basics of good childhood nutrition; how to support businesses that provide local, organic food; and ways to promote widespread change throughout a community.

     

  • Free for All: Fixing School Food in America
    by Janet Poppendieck (University of California Press © 2011)
    Explores the deep politics of food provision from multiple perspectives – history, policy, nutrition, environmental sustainability, taste, and more – while offering a sweeping vision for change.

     

  • School Lunch Politics: The Surprising History of America’s Favorite Welfare Program
    (Princeton University Press © 2008)
    Investigates the politics and culture of food; most specifically, who decides what American children should be eating, what policies develop from those decisions, and how these policies might be better implemented